A Food Name Change

Cigarette Borek | giverecipe.com

We have a traditional pastry named cigarette borek (sigara boregi in Turkish). It is made of phyllo filled with feta and parsley and then fried. It is so tasty that you can eat more than ten at one time. They are that addictive! You can sip your beer when eating these, they go very well together. Cigarette borek is in shape of cigarettes- or cigars actually. However, some people do not like this resemblance and they want to change the food name! They think the name of this borek promotes smoking. Don’t you think it’s ridiculous? I don’t smoke, but I’m totally against this change. Everyone knows this borek with that name and I don’t know anyone who starts smoking due to cigarette borek.

Union of Restaurant Owners in Adapazari decided to change this food name just for this reason, they can’t stand hearing the “word” smoking in a food name. They made a meeting for this issue and decided on a new name for the borek. The new name for cigarette borek is pencil borek! They hope people won’t use the former name anymore to prevent possible new smokers after eating this borek. What do you think? Is it reasonable to change a food name? Do you think the name of this borek has such a bad effect on people?



Comments

  1. says

    Sometimes this political correctness thing goes way too far. I like calling things just the way they have always been called. Great photo, btw!

    • says

      There must be a reason why they were called so. There are lots of funny food names in our cuisine, but I love them as they are, too.

  2. The Mom Chef ~ Taking on Magazines One Recipe at a Time says

    That kind of change has been happening for a long time here. In professional sports, they’re talking about changing the name of the Washington Redskins because it’s demeaning to the Native Americans. In auto racing, they changed the names of the leagues from Winston Cup and Busch Cup because Winston is a brand of cigarettes and Busch is a brand of beer. Everything that is a vice is now politically incorrect.

    • says

      I can understand the change if it’s offensive for a group of people. If the name advertises a brand as you mentioned, which one got that name first must be searched and that one can continue with that name. But I can’t see the logic behind others like the one in this news.

  3. Lydia says

    haha, This is ridiculous, indeed! I’ll bet the “new” name won’t catch on…

  4. says

    I think it’s silly to worry about changing the name, especially when I think you can still buy candy cigarettes.

    I just learned something new! Never heard of this before and NEVER would have thought you could fry phyllo. I always assumed it would fall apart because it’s so thin. Now I’m going to have to try it! :)

    • says

      I think this borek is much more innocent when compared with candy cigarettes.
      As the phyllo is rolled, it is no longer thin, so you can fry it in this way. You will love it!

  5. Merve Ozcan says

    There are too many things that remind us our bad habbits in everyday life. Could we ban or change all of these words? İs it essential? I don’t think so. I wonder if are those people we talk about planing a revulotion by changing this borek’s name? That’s funny to hear such kind of actions in our globalized world. It must remain as ‘Sigara Böreği’ , like a legend. I don’t smoke either, but think that no one can ignore the consept of cigaratte i this way. On the contrary, we should make public aware of causes and effects of using tobacco products, not only cigarattes. Otherwise, our protest condemned to be a rather weak.

    • says

      Merve, I couldn’t have agreed more! Playing with names is such a simple act, noone can reach success with it. If they want a real success on decreasing the number of smokers, they should go behind this. As you say, public awareness is the keyword here.

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